Advice from a Baltimore Bankruptcy Lawyer

One of the hardest things for me to do is admit I’m in trouble and ask for help.  I don’t think I’m alone in this.  In fact, I know I’m not.  I have practiced law in three states over the course of ten years.  In my experience as a Baltimore Bankruptcy Lawyer I’ve seen a lot of situations, but far too often, what I see are people who needed help but didn’t feel like they could ask.  I’ve met with wives desperate to keep the financial news from their husbands, husbands who didn’t want their wives to know that they were broke.  The news always comes out.  There is always something that spills the beans or, more often, the other spouse had suspicions or was purposefully ignorant of the situation.

But this topic extends beyond the immediate household.  Debt and the depression and isolationism that it often brings affects not just your spouse and your kids, but also your siblings, your parents, your cousins, aunts, uncles and friends.  When you’re struggling with debt and exhibiting some of the signs of that struggle, it’s noticeable much of the time.  Your friends and family may not know WHAT is wrong, but they know or suspect that SOMETHING is wrong.

Now, a couple things we aren’t going to talk about in depth:  Asking for financial assistance from family and friends.  That’s a very personal conversation and I wouldn’t deem to tell you how to do that, but were I on the receiving end of that conversation, I would want to know a few things.  What got you to this point and what is your plan of getting out.  If you don’t have those, the best help I think I could give would be to help you determine the answer to those two questions.  And THEN we could talk about financial help.  Second, your family may suggest bankruptcy.  You’re here at this site, you know or should know that that’s an option.  Keep it in mind as you talk to family and friends as an option, but that’s not the point of this article.

So, what is the point?  Encouragement, advice, comfort.  Your friends and family know you far better than I do.  They know what you’re capable of and what your weaknesses are.  There is often a lot of wisdom in that knowledge and it can serve you well.  Am I suggesting that you listen to your friends over your lawyer.  That depends.  I wouldn’t normally suggest that, but you should at least consider all sides, but when it comes to your legal options, of course listen to the professional first, but as far as making a decision on what to do with that information.  That’s yours alone and who you choose to allow to influence that decision is up to you.

Sometimes Talking to Family Can be Harder than talking to a Baltimore Bankruptcy Lawyer

I’m a firm believer that your life is your business, but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t encourage you to improve your life.  To make a change to your debt situation to solidify your financial position and protect yourself and your family.  That’s one of the reasons I spend the time I do writing these articles.  I know dealing with debt is hard, but the sooner you deal with it the easier it is, trust me.  I know for many of you, the thought of exposing this problem to your friends and family is difficult, which is why I encourage the bandaid method.  Just rip that sucker off and deal with it.  To quote Nike and Michael Jordan, “Just Do It!”

But, if it helps to talk to an stranger first, by all means, give this Baltimore Bankruptcy Lawyer a call, let’s talk about your loved one’s debt problems, let’s work on a strategy, and let’s work on ways to bring your family into this issue and find ways for you to help them.

Do you have a loved one that could benefit from this conversation?  Don’t know how to talk to them about their debt problems?  Follow the link and check out our other articles.  If you need help talking to your loved ones about your or their debt problems, feel free to drop me a line and let’s discuss.